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Master of Optometry

Overview

Highly qualified professional optometrists are always in great demand in the ophthalmic industry. Vision care services continue to expand and advancement in vision care technology is creating demand for highly trained & qualified optometrists. Increase in number of super speciality eye care hospitals & multinational companies in vision care, qualified post graduates in Optometry are in need.

[College Code Kolkata: NCMTKOL]    [College Code Durgapur: NCMTDGP]

Master of Optometry
Course Level PG
Duration 2 Years
Eligibility B.Optom
Type Degree

This Master of Optometry course with its sub-specializations give graduate optometrists the opportunity to provide enhanced clinical care of patients and specialty vision care services in the community. They can participate in global research activities and will be able to gain the competency as optometry educators which can largely contribute to optometry teaching.

Our Master of Optometry students through their theoretical and hands on speciality clinical exposures will develop their clinical skills to undertake extended Clinical roles. They will facilitate the integration of their scientific knowledge, evidence and practice to stimulate knowledge transfer & partnerships in vision care industry and community eye care.


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Scope & Career Opportunities

  • Private  & Associated practice,
  • Speciality optometry practices like Low Vision, Contact lens, Binocular vision, occupational optometry
  • Teaching in optometry Institutions/ Universities
  • Research / PhD
  • Entrepreneurship

Curriculum

Year I

  • Applied Optometric Optics
  • Advanced ophthalmic diagnostic procedure & instrumentation
  • Epidemiology and community Optometry
  • Research Methodology & Biostatistics
  • Business aspects in optometry
  • Applied Clinical Optometry
  • Advanced contact lens practice I
  • Geriatric optometry & Low vision rehabilitation I
  • Ocular diseases & Therapeutics
  • Pediatric Optometry & Binocular Vision I

Year II

  • Recent advances in Optometry
  • Occupational optometry
  • Geriatric optometry and low vision rehabilitation II
  • Pediatric optometry & binocular vision II
  • Advance contact lens practice II
  • Speciality Clinics
  • Dissertation

Eligibility

B.Optom or graduate in Optometry


Duration

2 years


FAQs

A.      What is Optometry?

The World Council of Optometry (WCO) defines it as:

“a healthcare profession that is autonomous, educated, and regulated (licensed/registered), and optometrists are the primary healthcare practitioners of the eye and visual system who provide comprehensive eye and vision care, which includes refraction and dispensing, detection/diagnosis and management of disease in the eye, and the rehabilitation of conditions of the visual system.”

B.      What is the importance of Optometry as a field of study in India?

An estimated 456 million people of India’s population of 1.12 billion people require vision correction (spectacles, contact lenses or refractive surgery) to be able to see and function for learning, work and life in general. Twenty six million people are blind or vision impaired due to eye disease. A further 133 million people, including 11 million children, are blind or vision impaired simply from lack of an eye examination and an appropriate pair of glasses (uncorrected refractive error).

Blindness and vision impairment place a significant economic burden on families, communities and society at large – due to lost productivity, as well as the cost of education and rehabilitation. About 85% of all vision impairment and 75% of blindness globally could be avoided, prevented or cured if the appropriately trained personnel and care facilities existed. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) launched the global initiative VISION 2020: the Right to Sight to eliminate avoidable blindness and vision impairment.

Uncorrected refractive error is the major cause of avoidable vision impairment, and the second most common cause of blindness. “Without appropriate optical correction, millions of children are losing educational opportunities and adults are excluded from productive working lives, with severe economic and social consequences. Individuals and families are pushed into a cycle of deepening poverty because of their inability to see”.

In 2007, an estimated 456 million people of India’s population of 1.12 billion people required vision correction (spectacles, contact lenses or surgery) to be able to see and function for learning, work and general life activities. This included 37 million children younger than 16 years of age. Almost all of these 456 million adults and children would have normal vision if they had access to an eye examination and an appropriate pair of spectacles. However, lack of access has left 133 million of them, including 11 million children, blind or vision impaired from uncorrected refractive error.

The burden of avoidable blindness and vision impairment on the health care system in India is significant, with India currently having the highest number of blind people in the world33.The direct and indirect cost, including lost productivity, due to uncorrected refractive error in India has been estimated at $23 billion per year (I$269 billion globally). As the population ages, future demand for eye care services will increase substantially. Enhancing access to these services will require an increase in the number of eye care professionals, as well as more efficient utilisation of existing professionals.

C.      What is the Scope of Optometry as a profession?

Optometry is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an independent profession through its ongoing official relations with the World Council of Optometry (WCO) – the international optometric organization which represents almost 300,000 optometrists from 87 member organizations in 47 countries.

Optometry as a profession has the primary public health responsibility for eliminating uncorrected refractive error. To provide excellent vision care to all the people of the country, India needs 116,000 optometrists. India currently has approximately 9,000 4-year trained optometrists and an estimated 30,000 2-year trained eye care personnel.

It is one of the top ten income earning profession in India & abroad. Optometrist enjoy the benefits of financial security, independence and recognition in the community.

D.      What are the Career Opportunities for an Optometrist?

          Corporate sector

          Private practice

          Work for an optical chain or under an optical store

          Public health

          Industries/companies

          Eye care hospitals & institutions

          Education sector

          Scientific research

          Basic research and integrated professional areas

E.       Why Study Optometry @ NSHM?

NSHM Knowledge Campus has set up a state-of-art-infrastructure facility along with an up-to-date modern curriculum to prepare students for the challenge ahead. Students on successful completion of their course curriculum are well-equipped to meet the demand for the vision care services. Here are some of the highlights of the infrastructure:

1.       Optometry Lab: The Optometry department has dedicated laboratory space and equipment floor area of about 3000 sq ft. The different laboratories of the department are as follows:

          Optics Lab

          Anatomy & Physiology Lab

          Microbiology & Pathology Lab

          Ophthalmic Dispensing Lab

          Ophthalmic Instruments Lab

          Clinical Refraction Lab

          Binocular Vision Lab

          Contact Lens Lab

          Low Vision Lab

This is a vital part of the course and the institute takes great care in ensuring that it gets due attention.

2.       Demonstration Labs: Few demonstration labs are utilized to train students on clinical skills and are equipped with state-of-art instruments for refraction, contact lens, low vision devices and orthoptics (which deals with the muscle tissues around the eyes)

3.       Optometry Clinic: For hands on experience to understand the real challenges faced in the professional front, optometry clinics focusing on various aspects of vision are run as part of the course curriculum. The department runs following specialty clinics:

          General Eye clinic

          Children’s vision clinic

          Contact lens clinic

          Low vision clinic

          Binocular vision clinic

4.       International Resource Centers: Students can access resource materials of International Association of Contact Lens Educators (IACLE) and Brien Holden Vision Institute Foundation (Formerly called ICEE Australia) to enhance the knowledge in the emerging areas of contact lens & ophthalmic dispensing.

What is Optometry?

The World Council of Optometry (WCO) defines it as:

“a healthcare profession that is autonomous, educated, and regulated (licensed/registered), and optometrists are the primary healthcare practitioners of the eye and visual system who provide comprehensive eye and vision care, which includes refraction and dispensing, detection/diagnosis and management of disease in the eye, and the rehabilitation of conditions of the visual system.”

What is the importance of Optometry as a field of study in India?

An estimated 456 million people of India’s population of 1.12 billion people require vision correction (spectacles, contact lenses or refractive surgery) to be able to see and function for learning, work and life in general. Twenty six million people are blind or vision impaired due to eye disease. A further 133 million people, including 11 million children, are blind or vision impaired simply from lack of an eye examination and an appropriate pair of glasses (uncorrected refractive error).

Blindness and vision impairment place a significant economic burden on families, communities and society at large – due to lost productivity, as well as the cost of education and rehabilitation. About 85% of all vision impairment and 75% of blindness globally could be avoided, prevented or cured if the appropriately trained personnel and care facilities existed. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) launched the global initiative VISION 2020: the Right to Sight to eliminate avoidable blindness and vision impairment.

Uncorrected refractive error is the major cause of avoidable vision impairment, and the second most common cause of blindness. “Without appropriate optical correction, millions of children are losing educational opportunities and adults are excluded from productive working lives, with severe economic and social consequences. Individuals and families are pushed into a cycle of deepening poverty because of their inability to see”.

In 2007, an estimated 456 million people of India’s population of 1.12 billion people required vision correction (spectacles, contact lenses or surgery) to be able to see and function for learning, work and general life activities. This included 37 million children younger than 16 years of age. Almost all of these 456 million adults and children would have normal vision if they had access to an eye examination and an appropriate pair of spectacles. However, lack of access has left 133 million of them, including 11 million children, blind or vision impaired from uncorrected refractive error.

The burden of avoidable blindness and vision impairment on the health care system in India is significant, with India currently having the highest number of blind people in the world33.The direct and indirect cost, including lost productivity, due to uncorrected refractive error in India has been estimated at $23 billion per year (I$269 billion globally). As the population ages, future demand for eye care services will increase substantially. Enhancing access to these services will require an increase in the number of eye care professionals, as well as more efficient utilisation of existing professionals.

What is the Scope of Optometry as a profession?

Optometry is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an independent profession through its ongoing official relations with the World Council of Optometry (WCO) – the international optometric organization which represents almost 300,000 optometrists from 87 member organizations in 47 countries.

Optometry as a profession has the primary public health responsibility for eliminating uncorrected refractive error. To provide excellent vision care to all the people of the country, India needs 116,000 optometrists. India currently has approximately 9,000 4-year trained optometrists and an estimated 30,000 2-year trained eye care personnel.

It is one of the top ten income earning profession in India & abroad. Optometrist enjoy the benefits of financial security, independence and recognition in the community.

What are the Career Opportunities for an Optometrist?

          Corporate sector

          Private practice

          Work for an optical chain or under an optical store

          Public health

          Industries/companies

          Eye care hospitals & institutions

          Education sector

          Scientific research

          Basic research and integrated professional areas

Why Study Optometry @ NSHM?

NSHM Knowledge Campus has set up a state-of-art-infrastructure facility along with an up-to-date modern curriculum to prepare students for the challenge ahead. Students on successful completion of their course curriculum are well-equipped to meet the demand for the vision care services. Here are some of the highlights of the infrastructure:

1.       Optometry Lab: The Optometry department has dedicated laboratory space and equipment floor area of about 3000 sq ft. The different laboratories of the department are as follows:

          Optics Lab

          Anatomy & Physiology Lab

          Microbiology & Pathology Lab

          Ophthalmic Dispensing Lab

          Ophthalmic Instruments Lab

          Clinical Refraction Lab

          Binocular Vision Lab

          Contact Lens Lab

          Low Vision Lab

This is a vital part of the course and the institute takes great care in ensuring that it gets due attention.

2.       Demonstration Labs: Few demonstration labs are utilized to train students on clinical skills and are equipped with state-of-art instruments for refraction, contact lens, low vision devices and orthoptics (which deals with the muscle tissues around the eyes)

3.       Optometry Clinic: For hands on experience to understand the real challenges faced in the professional front, optometry clinics focusing on various aspects of vision are run as part of the course curriculum. The department runs following specialty clinics:

          General Eye clinic

          Children’s vision clinic

          Contact lens clinic

          Low vision clinic

          Binocular vision clinic

4.       International Resource Centers: Students can access resource materials of International Association of Contact Lens Educators (IACLE) and Brien Holden Vision Institute Foundation (Formerly called ICEE Australia) to enhance the knowledge in the emerging areas of contact lens & ophthalmic dispensing.

 


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